Congratulations to Al Tait, Commonwealth Rutherford Fellow!

Congratulations to Alastair Tait, who is now a Commonwealth Rutherford Fellow at the University of Stirling! He is now searching for stony meteorites on Mars. This is wonderful news and very well deserved! All the best for the next exciting chapter of your career in combining in geomicrobiology and meteoritics, Al!

Welcome to Maija Raudsepp!

Welcome to Dr. Maija Raudsepp who has joined the EEGL team a as Postdoctoral Research Fellow. Maija is a geomicrobiologist who is working on the biogeochemistry of sediments in hypersaline lakes. She has a wealth of experience studying how microorganisms cycle sulfur, iron and methane in sedimentary environments, including in the deep subsurface via an …

M.Sc. and Ph.D. Projects in Sustainable Mineral Resources, Biogeochemistry, and Environmental Behaviour of Minerals

Applications are welcome for several M.Sc. and Ph.D. projects starting September 2018 in the Environmental Economic Geology Laboratory at the University of Alberta. Graduate researchers will join an interdisciplinary research team under the supervision of Dr. Siobhan (Sasha) Wilson. We are looking for independent, creative and collaborative students who are interested in developing new ideas …

Three (3) PDF Positions in Geochemistry of Accelerated Carbonation of Mine Wastes

Applications are now open for three postdoctoral research positions in the geochemistry/biogeochemistry of accelerated carbonation of ultramafic mine wastes. One position will be held at each of Trent University, the University of Alberta and the University of British Columbia in Canada. All applications will be considered together and full details can be found here. Review of …

New publication: Environmental microorganisms colonise meteorites and leave a record of their presence

Hot off the press: In a new study led by Alastair Tait, we have shown that environmental microorgansims from Australia’s arid Nullarbor Plain very commonly colonise stony meteorites that have fallen to Earth. Microbes take advantage of the composition and properties of minerals in meteorites to scavenge water, regulate pH, and derive nutrients and energy. …

New results: Substrate controls first terrestrial microbes to colonise meteorites!

New results from our lab show that the geochemistry and physical properties of a sterile rock control which microorganisms are able to colonise that rock. In a study led by Alastair Tait, we show that the structure of the microbial community in stony meteorites collected from Australia’s Nullarbor Plain is controlled by the substrate and …

New paper: field-based XRD for carbon accounting!

Recent results from our group show that portable X-ray diffraction can be used for accurate field-based accounting of carbon sequestration in minerals. This study, led by Connor Turvey, shows that crystallographic carbon accounting results can be comparably accurate using portable and laboratory-based X-ray diffractometers. Find out more here: 10.2138/am-2017-5953.

New paper on regrowth of arsenate–sulfate effloresences

Our lab has published new results that show the regrowth of arsenate–sulfate effloresences on the walls of processing plant buildings at an historical arsenic–tin mine in New South Wales. This result is interesting because it shows that simply removing the efflorescences will not remediate the processing site. You can learn more here: 10.1016/j.apgeochem.2017.01.015.

New results on metal mobility during carbon mineralisation!

  Check out our recent results on metal mobility during carbon mineralisation! This study was led by Jess Hamilton. It shows that potentially hazardous first row transition metals are immobilised within the crystal structures of carbonate minerals, and adsorbed to Fe-oxyhydroxides, under conditions relevant to carbon mineralisation in ultramafic landscapes and industrial reactors. You can …